What Is Inquiry Based Learning In Education?

Inquiry-based learning is a form of active learning that starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge.

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What is inquiry based learning?

Inquiry based learning is an instructional method in which students gain knowledge by actively exploring real-world phenomena. This type of learning is often associated with hands-on activities and experiential learning. Through inquiry, students develop a deeper understanding of concepts and skills by applying them to their own experiences.

Inquiry based learning is often contrasted with traditional methods of instruction, which tend to be more passive in nature. In a traditional classroom setting, students are typically presented with information through lectures or textbooks. They are then asked to regurgitate this information back to the teacher in the form of essays or exams. In contrast, inquiry based learning allows students to explore concepts and skills for themselves. This type of learning has been shown to be more effective in promoting long-term understanding and retention.

There are many different ways to implement inquiry based learning in the classroom. One common approach is to start with a problem or question that students need to solve. As they work on solving the problem, they will learn new concepts and skills that are relevant to the task at hand. This type of inquiry is often referred to as problem-based learning. Another approach is project-based learning, which involves having students complete a real-world project that requires them to use their newly acquired knowledge and skills.

Inquiry based learning is an effective instructional method for promoting student engagement and deep understanding. If you’re interested in implementing this type of instruction in your classroom, there are many resources available to help you get started.

What are the benefits of inquiry based learning?

Inquiry-based learning is a student-centered pedagogy in which students learn through inquiry. That is, they learn by actively investigating real-world problems. This type of learning contrasts with more traditional approaches, in which teachers provide students with information and then test their knowledge of that information.

There are many benefits to inquiry-based learning. First, it helps students develop a deep understanding of concepts, rather than just memorizing facts. Second, it encourages students to be creative and to think critically. Third, it promotes collaborative learning, as students often work together to solve problems. Finally, inquiry-based learning is often more engaging for students than traditional methods, leading to increased motivation and improved academic performance.

What are the challenges of inquiry based learning?

While inquiry-based learning can be extremely beneficial for students, it can also pose some challenges. One of the biggest challenges is that it requires students to be more independent and self-directed than traditional methods of instruction. This can be a difficult adjustment for students who are used to being told what to do and how to do it. Additionally, inquiry-based learning often requires more time than traditional instruction, as students need time to explore, ask questions, and find answers. This can be a challenge for teachers who are used to working within a set time frame. Finally, inquiry-based learning can be messy! As students are exploring and trying new things, there is bound to be some trial and error. This can be frustrating for both teachers and students if they are not prepared for it.

Inquiry based learning in the classroom

Inquiry-based learning is a students-centered, teacher-guided instructional approach that supports student involvement in asking questions, investigating problems, and making discoveries. It is aligned with how students learn best and oriented toward developing the skills and dispositions that will help them become successful college students and productive citizens.

Many teachers are using inquiry-based instruction without even realizing it. If you ask your students to explain their thinking, justify their answers, or support their opinions with evidence, you are engaging in inquiry-based instruction. Inquiry-based learning goes beyond these simple questions by providing opportunities for students to design their own investigations, make new discoveries, and share their findings with others.

Inquiry based learning and technology

Inquiry based learning is a type of learning that is student-centered and driven by questions from the learner. It is a hands-on, collaborative, and exploratory type of learning that allows students to use technology to find answers to their questions.

Inquiry based learning and assessment

Inquiry-based learning is a type of active learning that starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge. It involves learners in multistage processes of problem solving in order to investigate and develop their own understanding of real-world phenomena. And it requires content that is appropriately challenging, so that students’ inquiry can produce worthwhile results. Finally, effective inquiry-based learning experiences culminate in some form of sharing or public communication of what was learned.

Inquiry based learning and differentiated instruction

Inquiry based learning is a student-centered approach to instruction that allows students to explore a topic or question of interest. This type of learning is often used in differentiated instruction, where students are given the opportunity to learn at their own pace and in their own way. Inquiry based learning can be used in all subject areas and at all grade levels.

Inquiry based learning and problem based learning

Inquiry based learning and problem based learning are two approaches to education that have been gaining popularity in recent years. Both of these approaches emphasize the importance of students taking an active role in their own learning, rather than simply being passive recipients of information.

Inquiry based learning is often used in science education, as it allows students to explore scientific concepts for themselves, and to develop their own hypotheses and experiments. This approach can also be used in other subject areas such as history or English.

Problem based learning typically (but not always) takes place in a group setting, where students work together to solve a real-world problem. This type of learning has been shown to be particularly effective in developing problem-solving skills.

Inquiry based learning and 21st century skills

Inquiry based learning is a type of learning that allows students to explore a topic or question without being given a specific answer. This type of learning encourages students to ask questions, think critically, and find their own answers. Inquiry based learning can help students develop 21st century skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity.

Inquiry based learning and global citizenship

According to the Department of Education, inquiry-based learning is “a type of active learning that starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios—rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge.”

Inquiry-oriented classrooms are usually student-centered, with the teacher taking on more of a facilitator role. Students typically work in collaborative groups, where they’re encouraged to ask their own questions, investigate different solutions and draw their own conclusions.

Inquiry-based learning has been shown to promote global citizenship skills like critical thinking, creativity, collaboration and communication. It also helps students develop a deep understanding of concepts and ideas, rather than just acquiring surface-level knowledge.

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